ISLAND TREES TOURNAMENT AND CLUB DUES

On Sunday, October 23, 2016 the Island Trees Wrestling Club along with Locust Valley Club will be hosting a team duals at Island Trees High School located at 59 Straight Lane,  Levittown, New York, 11756. The cost is $30.00 dollar’s per entry ( each wrestler ). Weigh in’s are that morning between 7:00 A.M. and 8:00 A.M. You must be registered to a team and be listed on the roster. You do not need a USA card. It is plus three for every weight class. Admission is $2.00 for adults and $1.00 for children. There will be a concession stand. The wrestling will take place at the middle school and the high school.

Now while on the topic of the tournament. The Wantagh Wrestling Club will enter as many teams as necessary to make sure our club members are entered. That being said please remember that there are numerous wrestlers that have not joined the club. Our club costs $150.00 dollars for three months. We are willing to take a partial payment if you attend less than two sessions per week. If you want to pay over the three months that is also an option. Wantagh is the cheapest club around based on the value. We have our coaches from the Varsity present. These are the coaches that take care of you during the season and know each and every one of our team members. It is not fair that each and every wrestler from Wantagh not sign up. If you are playing another sport it is a great way to support or team. If you attend a private club you must pay the fee for the day, week, or month. If you attend a private lesson that is usually paid by the day. It is not fair that Wantagh is left out. We use the money to purchase equipment, uniforms, shorts, tee shirts, head gear, hotels, cleaning equipment, buses and entry fees.  Wantagh pays for a second team. This is not covered by the school. We try and enter the second team in as many events as possible. That’s why starting or being on the second team is vital to placing at the county’s.

If you did not pay the club dues chances are you will not be wrestling at Island Trees. It is not fair to the other club members from other schools or the wrestlers from our own team that did pay. Remember there is no excuse not to join the club and pay the entry fee even if you are not attending and play on another team.

OLYMPIC DREAMS

 

July 27, 2016

by Steve Fraser

Now that the Olympic Games have begun and our US Team is in their final preparation before the big event, I have recently been thinking about my own Olympic experience, 32 years ago. Sometimes it seems like yesterday. And sometimes it seems like a lifetime ago.

Ever since 1984, I have been known as an Olympic Champion. It is an incredible thrill to hear myself introduced that way at clinics, at speaking engagements or when meeting people in common, day to day situations. The very word “Olympian” has come to mean so much in life and I am honored to be among the elite group of men and women who have earned that label. And then to have won the gold medal is almost beyond belief sometimes.

But believe me, it wasn’t an easy path for me to become an Olympian much less an Olympic champion. The fact is, I was an average kid from an average home, growing up in the Detroit suburb of Hazel Park, Michigan, near 8 Mile Road and John R. I was not gifted, by any stretch of the imagination. I could claim no special athletic ability, no special smarts. I had a lot of doubts about myself as a kid.

I was from a lower middle class family. In fact, probably lower, lower middle class. My parents were divorced when I was five years old. My mother raised me and my three siblings. She made about $15,000 per year. My father wasn’t around much.

Somehow, largely because of wonderful teachers, coaches and role models in my life, I was able to achieve something that changed my life forever. To this very day I feel blessed that the many people that touch my life, touch it in a way that inspired me. I owe any wrestling, and life success, to these wonderful individuals. For without their guidance and caring ways, I would never have achieved the prestigious gold medal.

The 31st day of July, 1984, began quietly for me in my little corner of the Olympic Village on the University of Southern California campus, with no hint of the triumph and fury to come. I arose at 6:30 a.m. and slipped out of my bunk in the comfortable, two-bedroom apartment I shared with seven other members of the United States Olympic Wrestling Team. I showered, shaved and dressed as usual. As I looked in the mirror and combed my hair, the face I saw looked just as it had a thousand times before, and just as it has a thousand times since. It was not a face of greatness that I saw. It was not a reflection of someone special. I saw only me, Steve Fraser, an ordinary guy who had never set limits on what he could achieve.

Unaware that I was on the threshold of glory, I left my apartment at the Olympic Village and took the 45-minute bus ride to the Anaheim Convention Center, where the 1984 Olympic wrestling championships were being held. I had won my first two matches here, against Karolj Kopas of Yugoslavia and Tony Hannula of Finland. Now, upon arriving at the arena for the second day of competition, my first order of business was to check the pairings chart on the wall behind the weigh in scale and find out who my third opponent would be. When my eyes fell upon the identity of my opponent, my stomach turned in a flutter of excitement and surprise. I was to meet Frank Andersson of Sweden, the man virtually everyone regarded as the favorite in the 198-pound weight class for Greco-Roman.

Frank Andersson was a powerful, golden-haired athlete, who enjoyed the status of a movie star in Sweden and who had claimed the world championship gold medal in 1979, 1981 and 1982. Frank was definitely the favorite to win the Olympic gold medal.

One never knows what life has in store. My upset victory over Frank Andersson, that morning, led me to my next two Olympic victories. Later that evening I defeated George Poizidis of Greece in the semi-finals. The following evening I defeated Ilia Matei of Romania, in the finals, to win gold.

When the National Anthem was played, I had to blink several times to keep the tears from falling. I swallowed hard a few times and then began to sing. I had achieved my ultimate goal. I had realized all my wildest dreams. I was stunned, completely stunned, and happier than I could ever say. I was Olympic Champion!

If you believe, work hard enough, and search-out the right coaches/mentors, it is possible for any wrestler to achieve, if they want it bad enough.

FOOTBALL AND WRESTLING

How Wrestling Builds Better Football Players

Tim Krumrie was known for his intensity as a football player and coach. Krumrie spent 12 years in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals, where he was a two-time Pro Bowl selection as a nose tackle that helped lead the Bengals to the 1989 Super Bowl. Prior to that Krumrie spent four years as a starter at the University of Wisconsin. In 16 years of college and pro football, he never missed a start. He was known for his toughness, tenacity, and technique.

He credits those traits to wrestling. Krumrie was 29-0 as a senior at Mondovi High School in Wisconsin, winning a state heavyweight championship his senior year (1979), and spent two years as the heavyweight on the Wisconsin wrestling team, where he placed fifth in the 1981 Big Ten tournament.

“Wrestling gave me the technique to succeed in football,” said Krumrie, who went on to work as a defensive line coach for 15 years in the NFL after retiring as a player. “In wrestling, you are alone on the mat. Many times, I was alone against the center. I would play 60 plays a game in football. That’s like 60 starts to a wrestling match. Each play is a new start, a new match.”

As NFL training camps kick off across the country, former wrestlers everywhere are gearing up for another season of football, and another chance to use their wrestling background to succeed on the football field. Crockett Gillmore burst on the scene as a tight end for the Baltimore Ravens last year.

“Wrestling set me up for success as a football player,” said Gillmore, who expanded on his wrestling backgroundbefore the 2014 NFL Draft. “There are so many movements that are related in football. A big part of the game is technique, and I learned that in wrestling.”

At least 18 NFL teams have an ex-wrestler on the roster. Many teams have multiple wrestlers. The Pittsburgh Steelers have seven ex-wrestlers. The Indianapolis Colts have four, including kicker Adam Vinatieri, and Austin Blythe, a center who was a 2016 seventh round pick from the University of Iowa who is from Williamsburg, Iowa, where he won three state titles and recorded a state record 143 pins during his career.

USA Football is the national governing body for amateur American football in the United States. Coaches and leaders with the organization see the impact wrestling has on the development of football players.

“Balance and control against an external resistance, leverage and positioning and the ability to move a non-willing opponent are skills needed for all football positions,” said Andy Ryland, Senior Manager of Education and Training for USA Football said. “Wrestling does a great job teaching this.”

The Minnesota Vikings have four wrestlers on the roster and head coach Mike Zimmer is a former wrestler. His dad, Bill Zimmer coached Mike in football and wrestling at Lockport Township High School in Illinois and Bill is in both the Illinois High School wrestling and football hall of fames. Zimmer talked about how wrestling helped him go the extra mile in athletics and as a coach.

“I think you learn more from wrestling than any other sport,” Zimmer says. “You find out so much more about yourself and about competition. When it gets down to it, it’s you and the guy across from you. When I was wrestling, for the six minutes that you’re out there, it is one of the toughest, most demanding sports that I’ve ever been around. I think guys that can go through that and compete with all the different things going on, it really defines who you are.”

Krumrie rattled off a laundry list of skills learned in wrestling that transfer to the football field. It starts with the eyes, he says, being aware of your opponent and focusing on their every movement. Hand control. Technique. Stance. Balance. Footwork. Endurance. Quickness. Strength.

“In wrestling, if you get control of the hands, if you get that inside step, you have the edge,” said Krumrie.

It wasn’t just the interior linemen who benefited from wrestling either, says Krumrie. Skill players also use a wrestling background to their advantage. Green Bay Packers wide receiver Jared Abbrederis is a former wrestler.

“Look at everything a cornerback does,” he said. “Tackling is about form and technique. Using your hands. Wrestling teaches that.”

It also teaches something else.

“I can teach technique, but I can’t teach heart,” says Krumrie. “Every wrestler I ever coached had heart and tenacity. That was a given.”

LOSING CAN ALSO REMIND YOU WHAT IS GOOD IN LIFE

( From Wrestling Insider News magazine with Kyle Dake 4x NCAA Cornell Champion )

Perspective. Life is unfolding exactly how it is supposed to. I’ve poured my heart and soul into the sport of wrestling and have been very fortunate with the amount of success I have experienced. The reason wrestling and winning is so satisfying is the fact that you are putting everything into it: the hard work, the commitment, the time, the sleepless nights, the sacrifices and your body on the line to get your hand raised at the end of the day.And sometimes that doesn’t happen. Losing is an aspect of wrestling that everyone has experienced at some point in their life and it is the response to that losing that brings out who you truly are. Of, course, losing hurts and of course you never want to experience it, but sometimes it is exactly what is supposed to happen. Do I wish I would have won the Olympic Team Trials and had an opportunity to qualify the weight class for the Olympics ? Absolutely. But I can’t control what happened in the past. The only thing I can control is the moment I’m living in. Wrestling has shown me time and time again that it is about the journey and not the results. Wrestling is part of who I am and what I do every single day: and because it is such a large part of my life, it has undoubtedly become part of my personal growth. Dealing with adversity and overcoming it is something everyone has to face, some people are fighting every day for their life and that is something I try and realize every day. I am fortunate enough to be part of a great organization called the he Spartan Foundation, which is apart of Spartan Race and their goal is to give every single kid an opportunity to be a Spartan even if they are disabled. Speaking and being around these people, who are happier than ever to be alive, puts my life and troubles into perspective. I am a relatively healthy person with everything going for me. My perceived troubles are minuscule I can’t help but to let them go when I see a child not able to walk or speak because of the way she / he was born or see kids who don’t have shoes because their families can’t afford them. I’m living a very blessed life. Many of us are. But, we keep our binders on and think life is all about winning and losing, when in fact it is about loving all of our brothers and sisters, and helping others in need. We need to help each other. If I can help through the sport of wrestling, then everything that happens is totally worth it.

DAVID TAYLOR ( FORMER PENN STATE ALL AMERICAN )

The first thing you need to do coming of a tournament win or lose, is reflect on each and every match, each position. Where did you win and where did you lose each position ? I’ve taken this a couple of different ways in my own career. Of those three times at the ( World / Olympic ) Trials, I left very frustrated. I didn’t really move forward. I was bummed, my body was hurt and I was just king of ” checked out ” for a period of time. Now I’m ready to get better. A lot of wrestlers or athletes in any sport take a loss negatively or find a way to take it positively. It’s heartbreaking. But there are a lot of other things out there. Wrestling is a small part of what we’re really put here for. It’s about impacting lives in a positive way. It’s influencing others. It’s being a good teammate, husband, son, daughter, finance and boyfriend / girlfriend. Just because wrestling goals didn’t work out, there are still a lot of other great things to be appreciative of. Your support group is who you need to thank the most.

TOP REASONS TO WRESTLE FREESTYLE AND GRECO ROMAN IN THE OFF SEASON

Top 3 Reasons to Wrestle Freestyle and Greco-Roman

1.  Find the Best Competition

this is the path the best wrestlers have been on for decades.  The best wrestlers and teams will be at off-season FS and GR tournaments and that is who you want to compete against if you desire a State Championship.  This makes my point relevant everywhere.  No matter what level your state is at if you are training to beat the best you are preparing to be a State Champion.  If you are on the state, regional and national FS and GR circuit you will probably be separating yourself from the pack.

2.  Sharpen Folksytle Techniques

Most of the Folkstyle fundamentals needed to be a State Champion are very important in FS & GR.  Striving to be successful in FS & GR will solidify the techniques and strategies that are essential in Folkstyle.

Top 5 Folkstyle Techniques and Strategies Sharpened in FS & GR

  1. Finish shots quick and preferably on the feet.
  2. Control opponent and learn to use edge of the mat.
  3. Clearing out of Front Headlocks
  4. How to use a Tight Waist effectively
  5. Improve Hand Fighting Skills

And many more…

3. Master The Art of Winning Close Matches

Winning close matched, often comes down to focus and determination.  The scoring pace in Freestyle and Greco-Roman and be high paced and points can go up quick.  This forces wrestlers to stay focused and sharp in all positions.  Learning to be alert and hustling in all positions is what it takes to win tough matches in any style and wrestling Freestyle and Greco-Roman is the perfect training ground to sharpen these skills.

Strategy to succeed in Freestyle Wrestling:

Below is a breakdown of the skills and progression a wrestler can use to quickly have success in FS & GR.  Combine these skills with your Folkstyle skills and you will definitely hold your own and be on the State Champion’s plan.

Neutral — Wrestlers can use the same scoring techniques they learn in Folkstyle to score in Freestyle.  One thing that is different in Freestyle is the exposure rule.  In Freestyle you don’t need to get a count to get 2 back points.  If you expose your opponent by breaking 90 degrees you will score 2 points.  With this in mind, your shot finishes need to be extra sharp or you can get tilted off your shots.  That means you need to tighten up your shot finishes. Also, with the exposure rules you can be tilted from a front headlock  position so you need to clear out of this quickly.  These are all things that coaches preach consistently to wrestlers during the high school season.

If you really want to have fun and learn how to score points quickly you should learn to tilt off your opponent’s shots. This isn’t a necessity but will give you more scoring opportunities from the feet and they are pretty fun to learn.

WANTAGH WRESTLING ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER

OK THE SEASON IS OFFICALLY HERE. PRACTICE IS HERE. PLEASE NOTE THE SCHEDULE HAS BEEN CHANGED. 11/30/2013 IS A SATURDAY NOT A WEDNESDAY. MY BAD.

DONATIONS: WE HAVE RECEIVED SOME RECENTLY AND WE WANTED TO SAY THANK-YOU. IF ANYONE WANTS TO MAKE A TAX FREE DONATION TO THE WANTAGH WRESTLING CLUB WE ARE ALWAYS READY. DURING THE COURSE OF THE YEAR: WE FUND TWO TEAMS, RUN PRACTICES AND LIFTING ALL YEAR LONG, HAVE PURCHASED SIX WRESTLING MATS, PURCHASE CLEANING MATERIALS, UNIFORMS, HOTEL, TRAVEL, DISCOUNTED EQUIPMENT, TEE SHIRTS, ETC. WE ARE ALL ABOUT THE KIDS.  THANKS AGAIN IN ADVANCE.
RAY HANLEY, CELL 516-526-8632, MAILING ADDRESS PO BOX 7095 WANTAGH, NEW YORK, 11793.

SCHOOL WORK AND A TUTOR: ( GIVE YOUR CHILD THE BOOST HE OR SHE NEEDS. A FORMER TEACHER, SAT, ACT, STATE TESTING, WHATEVER YOU NEED )
HORIZON ENTERPRISES, WWW.COACH-2-ACHIEVE.COM
DR. MONA MARSHALL
2897 NOEL COURT, WANTAGH, NEW YORK, 11893
516-322-8675

ALUMUNI NIGHT IS BEING RE-DONE. WE WILL LET EVERYONE KNOW WHAT DATE, TIME, ETC WHEN WE SECURE THE NEW INFORMATION.

I AM DOING ALL THE POSTING ON THE WEB SITE. PLEASE MAKE SURE I HAVE THE NAMES SPELLED CORRECT. IF I LEAVE SOMETHING OUT CALL ME. I WILL ALSO POST SCORES AND KEEP THE RECORDS FOR THE TEAM. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ASK QUESTIONS. I WILL POST SCHEDULE, PRACTICES AND ANY OTHER CHANGES. PUT YOUR NAME ON THE E-MAIL LIST. 

Wantagh Wrestling is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/wantaghwarriorwrestling and follow us on Twitter  www.twitter.com/wantaghwrestle for up to date news and photos.

NCAA BANNED SUBSTANES

ANABOL AGENTS ( STERIODS )
ANDROSTENEDIONE
DHEA
NANDROLNE
TESTOSTERONE
THG ( TETRAHYDROGESTRINONE )
19-NORANDROSTENEDIONE AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

STIMULANTS
COCAINE
EPHEDRINE
METHAMPHETAMINE
SYNEPHRINE ( CITRUS AURANTIUM, ZHI SHI, BITTER ORANGE )
AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

STREET DRUGS
HEROIN
MARIJUANA
THC ( TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL )

DIURETICS AND URINE MANIPULATORS
BUMETANIDE
PROBENICD
FINASTERIDE ( PROPECIA ) AND OTHER COMPOUNDS

PEPTIDE HORMONES AND ANALOGUES
ERYTHROPOIETIN ( EPO )
HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE ( HGH ) AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

ANTI-ESTROGENS
CLOMIPHENE ( CLOMID )
TAMOXIFEN AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

BETA-2 AGONISTS
( PERMITTED BY INHALATION )
FORMOTEROL
SALMETROL

PRESCRIPTION MEDICINES*
ADDERALL, ANADROL, ANDROGEL, CYLERT, DEXEDRINE, EPOGEN, LASIX, OXANDRIN, RITALIN, TESTODERM
*MEDICAL PRESCRIPTION MAY BE GRANTED FOR REQUIRED USE WITH PROPER PRESCRIPTION.

NON-PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS
BRONKAID ( EPHEDRINE )
PRIMATENE TABLETS ( EPHEDRINE )

BANNED SUBSTANCES FOUND IN NUTRITIONAL / DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS
ANDROSTENEDIOL
ANDROSTENEDIONE
CAFFEINE
CITRUS AURANTIUM
DHEA
EPHEDRINE ( MA HUANG )
NORANDROSTENEDIOL
NORANDROSTENEDIONE
SYNEPHRINE

CHECK WITH YOUR ATHLETIC STAFF BEFORE USING ANY SUBSTANCES.. WWW.NCAA.ORG/HEALTH-SAFETY OR CALL TOLL FREE 877-202-0769

OTHER FEATURE ARTICLES: ALCOHOL AND THE EFFECTS ON THE ATHLETES BODY, CASINO NIGHT AT THE WANTAGH INN, 09/16/2011 AT 7:00 P.M. RESERVE YOUR SPOT.

ALCOHOL AND AFFECTS WITH SPORTS

Alcohol use cancels out gains from your workout: Everyone knows that working out while under the influence of alcohol is dangerous because of the likelihood of injury. However, few athletes realize that consuming alcohol after a workout, practice, or competition can cancel out any physiological gains you may have received from such activities. Not only does long-term alcohol use diminish protein synthesis resulting in a decrease in muscle build-up, but even short-term alcohol use can impede muscle growth.

FACT:  Alcohol causes dehydration and slows down the body’s ability to heal. Alcohol is a toxin that travels through your bloodstream to every organ and tissue in your body slowing your body’s ability to heal itself.

FACT: Alcohol use prevents muscle recovery. In order to build bigger and stronger muscles, your body needs sleep to repair it self after a workout. Because of alcohols effect on sleep, however, your body is robbed of a precious chemical called human growth hormone or HGH. HGH is part of the normal muscle-building and repair process. Alcohol can decrease the secretion of HGH by as much as 70%. Also drinking can trigger the production of a substance in your liver that is directly toxic to testosterone. Testosterone is essential for the development and recovery of your muscles.

FACT: Alcohol use depletes your source of energy. Once alcohol is absorbed through your stomach and small intestine and finally into your cells, it can disrupt the water balance in muscle cells, thus altering their ability to produce adenosine triphosphate ( ATP ) which is your muscles source of energy. ATP provides the fuel necessary for your muscles to contract. Alcohol also reduces energy sources by inhibiting a process known as gluconeogenesis in which glucose is formed from substances other than glucose. When alcohol is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenate ( an enzyme ) it produces an elevation of NADH, which reduces the amount of co enzyme that is essential in the production of ATP. The loss of ATP results in a lack of energy and endurance.

WANT TO BE A CHAMPION ? DON’T DRINK…

NEXT UP: NCAA BANNED SUBSTANCES.

Written by Gina Fifth, MA., LMHC., NCC
Director: Alcohol and Drug Education and Luis G. Manzo PHD., Staff Psychologist and Coordinator of Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Services,
University Counseling Center

WINNING

OK HERE IS MY FORUMLA SINCE I HAVE BEEN WRESTLING. MAYBE NOT MY WORDS BUT AGAIN THE MESSAGE IS THE SAME. IT COMES FROM THE HEART.

KEYS TO WINNING…

1.         Be a Fanatic Trainer: Some guys are strong. Some are quick. They good ones  always train all year round and hard. Never stop.

 2.         The only moves that matter are the ones you actually do and do well at high speeds.

 3.         Defense wins: If you score you may win.. If he never scores you won’t lose.  Defense wins…

 4.         One Move: You should always have one move that you do well enough at high  speeds that you can do once on anyone.

 5.         Conditioning is career long: Never let yourself get out of shape. Do some type  of workout three times per week, all year long.

 6.         Every workout is important:  Wrestle the best you can every time. Wrestle like  a Champion Today.

 7.         Seek out the best competition: Work out with the best training partner you can find. Go to the toughest tournaments you can find. STEEL SHARPENS  STEEL.

 8.         Training Schedule: Running ( 3 miles or more, 3 times per week with some sprints ) weight lifting, hard and correct drilling of technique, situation wrestling, good diet and proper rest.

 9.         Goal: You must have a goal and a detailed plan to attain your goal. Then work your plan. Never compromise on your goals and it will happen.

  10.       Be loyal to your parents, teammates, Coach and most of all yourself.

WORDS OF WISDOM..

 “Through wrestling, through the hard work and the
sweat, through the victories and the defeats, we
learn a great deal about ourselves. Wrestling shows
you your limits, your weaknesses, your strengths
and, ultimately, you grow because of what
it shows you.” – J Robinson

“2011 Off-Season Match Count has Begun!!!”